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Building a personal brand is all about capturing attention. If you work in a “boring” industry, it can be tough to communicate the key benefits that differentiate you from competitors. Especially when you work in an industry that’s not usually the topic of conversation or trending on social media.

Take the VoIP industry, a very boring industry. It’s hard to make VOIP stand out or make it “sexy”. People don’t usually turn to VoIP companies for engaging content, actionable educational or entertainment. But with the right attitude and the ability to produce quality content, leaders even in the boring Cloud VoIP industry can gain recognition and build an audience. (I’ll show you a real life example in bullet #1 below).

In this article I’ll show you real examples of how to capture your target market’s attention, convert them into stark raving fans, and build your personal brand even when you’re in a boring industry.

Ready? Let’s roll!

1. Be Bold. Be Authentic. 

Wallflowers and shrinking violets don’t build brands. People who are bold and enthusiastic do. For executives looking to make their mark and build a brand, being a hands-on, in the trenches type of person translates into authentic experience.

You don’t want to be the kind of exec that takes all the credit and not know how anything works. If your team does the heavy lifting while you get the kudos but you can’t explain how your widget works, then people are not going to respect your opinion.

Someone who shows they know what they are doing and can express their “Why” is going to be more authentic.

Don’t be afraid to have an opinion and share it, even if it happens to touch on the politics of the day. If it is earnest, authentic and well-thought-out—not some emotionally charged overreaction—then boldly proclaim it and let the discourse begin. That is what builds engagement, followers, and brands. 

Those who take a position and confidently support their way of thinking are more likely to stand out 

People value leaders who are confident and don’t flip-flop on their beliefs just to appease the masses. Sure, some feathers may get ruffled, but how many low-key, wishy-washy executives can you name? Exactly. You can’t name many because they don’t stand out and nobody knows who they are.

2. Share Actionable Expertise

Just because your industry isn’t interesting doesn’t mean no one is interested. You can still share your knowledge and expertise to build your brand. Take Ryan Stewman, the sales and marketing expert who runs a sales training called The Hardcore Closer.

Ryan gained a loyal following talking about lead generation. He has built a multi-million dollar business by taking what has worked for him, sharing it, and monetizing it.

Ryan was on the cutting edge of using social media and videos to promote himself and connect with people when he started in sales. Because of his success, he started to teach other salespeople how to use social media to connect with people and use tools for lead generation. 

He built a lead generation software company called Phonesites that helps salespeople create their own sales funnels. He offered free training on Facebook live and produced free content in the form of articles and training videos.

Sharing his expertise helped grow his personal brand which has allowed him to scale into other successful business ventures. He’s doing it right.

Chris the founder of SalesMessage is another great example. He has been using SMS texting to communicate with anyone who contacts their business or even subscribes to their webinars, events, or blog. 

He shares actionable tips, tricks and information while trying to covert some of the leads who contact him and gets a whopping 70% response rate on SMS texts. He recently shared the complete set of sample text messages to send to customers on his blog. He engages his potential customers and build his following.

But, one of the biggest mistakes you can make in personal branding is to be and act like someone you are not. You will eventually be outed, caught, or exposed. 

When building a personal brand, don’t pretend to be someone you’re not or have expertise when you don’t.

Elizabeth Holmes, CEO of the once highly-touted blood-testing startup Theranos, was once the darling of Silicon Valley. She was seen as an influencer and visionary in the same vein as Steve Jobs.

Theranos WAS Elizabeth Holmes and her personal brand of being a healthcare wunderkind carried the firm. Unfortunately for many people, the whole company and the whole story was a massive fraud. She faked her expertise and knowledge, the company was exposed and now it is no more.

A personal brand built on lies and half-truths will come back to bite you.

3. Be the MVP of Value

If you want to really stand out, you must be useful and add maximum value at all times. Do this by offering free info, training, and content about your industry and share that info while speaking at events and on podcasts.

We’re talking about sharing real expertise, not just thoughts or opinions, but practical knowledge that comes from actually having done the work.

Jack Kosakowski kills it here. Jack has been providing actionable social selling advice and content for over 5 years. With his SkillsLab social selling site, he has been helping salespeople to increase their presence through social media and how to correctly connect with—and sell to—their target clients. 

Value comes from experience. Jack has churned out content on social media, his blog, publications like The Harvard Business Review, and on podcasts—continually sharing what has worked for him, and how it took him from a newbie salesperson to the CEO of the US division of a Global Digital Agency.

4. Stop Selling and Build Trust Instead

Look, you don’t need to be Billy Mays or the ShamWow guy, pitching and promoting all day while operators are standing by. Constantly pushing product is exhausting. But talking and engaging with people in your own voice—your true self—and showing them how to succeed with examples and actionable ideas will build trust.

When you let people see the real you, trust is built and your brand strengthens and attracts new prospects.

Trust isn’t built by speaking AT people. It’s built by engaging and speaking WITH with your audience.

People like to do business with people they know, like and trust. And that’s usually not the guy with the bullhorn shouting “Look at me! Look at me!” Differentiate yourself by sharing knowledge from real-world experience in an authentic, engaging way that creates value and trustworthiness. This will build your personal brand.

When someone needs to seek out info in your industry, you will be top-of-mind because you will be the rockstar of your “boring” industry. They will come to you for the value you provide because you’ve built trust due to engagement, value, and expertise. 

 

The post Personal Branding Tips For Executives In “Boring” Industries appeared first on Personal Branding Blog – Stand Out In Your Career.

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Thanks to https://www.allbusiness.com/becoming-mentor-can-help-your-own-career-development-132142-1.html

By Cameron Papp

Let’s play a game. I’ll try to write some career growth tips without using the words “pandemic” or “Covid.”

Damn.

Well, these “recent times” have caused a lot of us to look inward. Am I growing? Am I making an impact on the world—or at least—my community?

I wasn’t asking any of these questions back in 2016 when I signed up to become a Big Brothers Big Sisters mentor. I had just moved to New York and I was just looking to meet new people and “get involved.” I’m sure I had some selfish inner reason to volunteer—to feel better about myself, too.

Perhaps that selfishness worked out because as much as I would like to hope that I’ve helped my mentee grow, I found that our roles are generally reversed. He’s helped me grow much more—and not only as a person, but as a career professional, too.

If you’re thinking about becoming a mentor, whether through a nonprofit program, your current job, or just part of your normal day-to-day, there can be life-changing benefits to it. For the purpose of this post, I’m going to focus on the benefits that I have found from mentorship from a career perspective.

What is mentorship?

First, I want to get across what mentorship is not:

  • Mentorship is not about you.
  • It is not about making yourself look good in front of your colleagues and friends.
  • It is not a vanity project that you slap on your resume or use for LinkedIn.
  • It is not a mechanism to show off your expertise. In fact, a good mentor can be perfectly effective NOT being an expert.

While mentorship is not a “me first” endeavor, there are numerous personal benefits you will gain from becoming a mentor. The following are are four important benefits that I have found from a career perspective:

1. You start to think more strategically

As a mentor, you start to become more reflective and think about “why” you do things the way you do. Studies have shown that the most effective way to learn something is to teach it to someone else. You start to think about the way you react to certain situations. And then, upon reflection, you’ll decide if that is the path you would recommend to your mentee, or perhaps you’ll offer them a better way based on your mistakes.

2. You become more than just a good listener

Mentoring is less about talking and more about listening. You learn that you can’t be a very effective teacher if you’re just talking the whole time. People will eventually tune you out. Once you start to realize this from a mentoring perspective, you learn this is even more important in the business world.

When I first started having my weekly calls with my mentee, I was terrified. “What am I going to talk about? What if I don’t have anything to say,” I wondered. Indeed, the early conversations were a bit one-way. But over time, I realized all I really needed to do was listen—and I mean really listen. That means being present, focused, and attentive.

You will be amazed by how much you can learn and be helpful to someone at the same time by just listening. I learned this from mentoring and I’ve started to practice it in my daily work life as well. My meetings have become much more productive.

Other Articles From AllBusiness.com:

3. You become a better problem solver

Mentoring really just comes down to honing in on your expertise to offer advice to someone else. This doesn’t mean you are necessarily the ultimate authority with all the right answers. It means you are looking back on your past experiences and leveraging them to accomplish something. This is problem-solving 101.

4. You build leadership skills

Maybe you haven’t yet been in a managerial role, but you will when you’re a mentor. All of a sudden, there is someone asking you for advice on how you would handle certain situations. There is something about this that triggers your brain to think in a different way. You stop thinking only about “just doing” and start thinking about “leading.”

One day, my mentee mentioned that he wasn’t getting along with a teacher and wanted to know what he should do about it. I asked if he had talked to his teacher about what he was struggling with? He said no. Then I remembered a quote attributed to George Bernard Shaw: “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”

I told my mentee that he will never solve the problem without communicating what that problem actually is. This made me think about my own issues at work and how I go about solving them. Am I leading by example? Am I giving this same advice to my colleagues?

What does it take to be a leader?

You need to be genuine, positive, and inspire others to be better. When you mentor someone, you are taking a mini-crash course on how to develop these qualities. Once you start to do this through your experience with your mentee, you will develop the skills necessary to do so with your colleagues as well.

RELATED: 7 Reasons Why You Need a Business Mentor—And How to Land One

About the Author

Post by: Cameron Papp

Cameron Papp is a growth-focused and accomplished communication professional with over eight years of experience in public and media relations. Cameron has proven success in developing and driving strategic communication programs for diverse organizations, ranging from scrappy startups to beloved global brands. He is currently the Head of Public Relations for TourRadar, a Series C backed technology startup. Prior to this role, he worked on the communications team at StubHub for six years.

Company: TourRadar
Website: www.cameronpapp.com
Connect with me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The post How Becoming a Mentor Can Help Your Own Career Development appeared first on AllBusiness.com. Click for more information about Guest Post. Copyright 2020 by AllBusiness.com. All rights reserved. The content and images contained in this RSS feed may only be used through an RSS reader and may not be reproduced on another website without the express written permission of the owner of AllBusiness.com.

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Thanks to https://www.allbusiness.com/becoming-mentor-can-help-your-own-career-development-132142-1.html

By Cameron Papp

Let’s play a game. I’ll try to write some career growth tips without using the words “pandemic” or “Covid.”

Damn.

Well, these “recent times” have caused a lot of us to look inward. Am I growing? Am I making an impact on the world—or at least—my community?

I wasn’t asking any of these questions back in 2016 when I signed up to become a Big Brothers Big Sisters mentor. I had just moved to New York and I was just looking to meet new people and “get involved.” I’m sure I had some selfish inner reason to volunteer—to feel better about myself, too.

Perhaps that selfishness worked out because as much as I would like to hope that I’ve helped my mentee grow, I found that our roles are generally reversed. He’s helped me grow much more—and not only as a person, but as a career professional, too.

If you’re thinking about becoming a mentor, whether through a nonprofit program, your current job, or just part of your normal day-to-day, there can be life-changing benefits to it. For the purpose of this post, I’m going to focus on the benefits that I have found from mentorship from a career perspective.

What is mentorship?

First, I want to get across what mentorship is not:

  • Mentorship is not about you.
  • It is not about making yourself look good in front of your colleagues and friends.
  • It is not a vanity project that you slap on your resume or use for LinkedIn.
  • It is not a mechanism to show off your expertise. In fact, a good mentor can be perfectly effective NOT being an expert.

While mentorship is not a “me first” endeavor, there are numerous personal benefits you will gain from becoming a mentor. The following are are four important benefits that I have found from a career perspective:

1. You start to think more strategically

As a mentor, you start to become more reflective and think about “why” you do things the way you do. Studies have shown that the most effective way to learn something is to teach it to someone else. You start to think about the way you react to certain situations. And then, upon reflection, you’ll decide if that is the path you would recommend to your mentee, or perhaps you’ll offer them a better way based on your mistakes.

2. You become more than just a good listener

Mentoring is less about talking and more about listening. You learn that you can’t be a very effective teacher if you’re just talking the whole time. People will eventually tune you out. Once you start to realize this from a mentoring perspective, you learn this is even more important in the business world.

When I first started having my weekly calls with my mentee, I was terrified. “What am I going to talk about? What if I don’t have anything to say,” I wondered. Indeed, the early conversations were a bit one-way. But over time, I realized all I really needed to do was listen—and I mean really listen. That means being present, focused, and attentive.

You will be amazed by how much you can learn and be helpful to someone at the same time by just listening. I learned this from mentoring and I’ve started to practice it in my daily work life as well. My meetings have become much more productive.

Other Articles From AllBusiness.com:

3. You become a better problem solver

Mentoring really just comes down to honing in on your expertise to offer advice to someone else. This doesn’t mean you are necessarily the ultimate authority with all the right answers. It means you are looking back on your past experiences and leveraging them to accomplish something. This is problem-solving 101.

4. You build leadership skills

Maybe you haven’t yet been in a managerial role, but you will when you’re a mentor. All of a sudden, there is someone asking you for advice on how you would handle certain situations. There is something about this that triggers your brain to think in a different way. You stop thinking only about “just doing” and start thinking about “leading.”

One day, my mentee mentioned that he wasn’t getting along with a teacher and wanted to know what he should do about it. I asked if he had talked to his teacher about what he was struggling with? He said no. Then I remembered a quote attributed to George Bernard Shaw: “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”

I told my mentee that he will never solve the problem without communicating what that problem actually is. This made me think about my own issues at work and how I go about solving them. Am I leading by example? Am I giving this same advice to my colleagues?

What does it take to be a leader?

You need to be genuine, positive, and inspire others to be better. When you mentor someone, you are taking a mini-crash course on how to develop these qualities. Once you start to do this through your experience with your mentee, you will develop the skills necessary to do so with your colleagues as well.

RELATED: 7 Reasons Why You Need a Business Mentor—And How to Land One

About the Author

Post by: Cameron Papp

Cameron Papp is a growth-focused and accomplished communication professional with over eight years of experience in public and media relations. Cameron has proven success in developing and driving strategic communication programs for diverse organizations, ranging from scrappy startups to beloved global brands. He is currently the Head of Public Relations for TourRadar, a Series C backed technology startup. Prior to this role, he worked on the communications team at StubHub for six years.

Company: TourRadar
Website: www.cameronpapp.com
Connect with me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The post How Becoming a Mentor Can Help Your Own Career Development appeared first on AllBusiness.com. Click for more information about Guest Post. Copyright 2020 by AllBusiness.com. All rights reserved. The content and images contained in this RSS feed may only be used through an RSS reader and may not be reproduced on another website without the express written permission of the owner of AllBusiness.com.

who else really loves this ?

Thanks to http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/personalbrandingblog/~3/nTldiNt2DVI/

Building a personal brand is all about capturing attention. If you work in a “boring” industry, it can be tough to communicate the key benefits that differentiate you from competitors. Especially when you work in an industry that’s not usually the topic of conversation or trending on social media.

Take the VoIP industry, a very boring industry. It’s hard to make VOIP stand out or make it “sexy”. People don’t usually turn to VoIP companies for engaging content, actionable educational or entertainment. But with the right attitude and the ability to produce quality content, leaders even in the boring Cloud VoIP industry can gain recognition and build an audience. (I’ll show you a real life example in bullet #1 below).

In this article I’ll show you real examples of how to capture your target market’s attention, convert them into stark raving fans, and build your personal brand even when you’re in a boring industry.

Ready? Let’s roll!

1. Be Bold. Be Authentic. 

Wallflowers and shrinking violets don’t build brands. People who are bold and enthusiastic do. For executives looking to make their mark and build a brand, being a hands-on, in the trenches type of person translates into authentic experience.

You don’t want to be the kind of exec that takes all the credit and not know how anything works. If your team does the heavy lifting while you get the kudos but you can’t explain how your widget works, then people are not going to respect your opinion.

Someone who shows they know what they are doing and can express their “Why” is going to be more authentic.

Don’t be afraid to have an opinion and share it, even if it happens to touch on the politics of the day. If it is earnest, authentic and well-thought-out—not some emotionally charged overreaction—then boldly proclaim it and let the discourse begin. That is what builds engagement, followers, and brands. 

Those who take a position and confidently support their way of thinking are more likely to stand out 

People value leaders who are confident and don’t flip-flop on their beliefs just to appease the masses. Sure, some feathers may get ruffled, but how many low-key, wishy-washy executives can you name? Exactly. You can’t name many because they don’t stand out and nobody knows who they are.

2. Share Actionable Expertise

Just because your industry isn’t interesting doesn’t mean no one is interested. You can still share your knowledge and expertise to build your brand. Take Ryan Stewman, the sales and marketing expert who runs a sales training called The Hardcore Closer.

Ryan gained a loyal following talking about lead generation. He has built a multi-million dollar business by taking what has worked for him, sharing it, and monetizing it.

Ryan was on the cutting edge of using social media and videos to promote himself and connect with people when he started in sales. Because of his success, he started to teach other salespeople how to use social media to connect with people and use tools for lead generation. 

He built a lead generation software company called Phonesites that helps salespeople create their own sales funnels. He offered free training on Facebook live and produced free content in the form of articles and training videos.

Sharing his expertise helped grow his personal brand which has allowed him to scale into other successful business ventures. He’s doing it right.

Chris the founder of SalesMessage is another great example. He has been using SMS texting to communicate with anyone who contacts their business or even subscribes to their webinars, events, or blog. 

He shares actionable tips, tricks and information while trying to covert some of the leads who contact him and gets a whopping 70% response rate on SMS texts. He recently shared the complete set of sample text messages to send to customers on his blog. He engages his potential customers and build his following.

But, one of the biggest mistakes you can make in personal branding is to be and act like someone you are not. You will eventually be outed, caught, or exposed. 

When building a personal brand, don’t pretend to be someone you’re not or have expertise when you don’t.

Elizabeth Holmes, CEO of the once highly-touted blood-testing startup Theranos, was once the darling of Silicon Valley. She was seen as an influencer and visionary in the same vein as Steve Jobs.

Theranos WAS Elizabeth Holmes and her personal brand of being a healthcare wunderkind carried the firm. Unfortunately for many people, the whole company and the whole story was a massive fraud. She faked her expertise and knowledge, the company was exposed and now it is no more.

A personal brand built on lies and half-truths will come back to bite you.

3. Be the MVP of Value

If you want to really stand out, you must be useful and add maximum value at all times. Do this by offering free info, training, and content about your industry and share that info while speaking at events and on podcasts.

We’re talking about sharing real expertise, not just thoughts or opinions, but practical knowledge that comes from actually having done the work.

Jack Kosakowski kills it here. Jack has been providing actionable social selling advice and content for over 5 years. With his SkillsLab social selling site, he has been helping salespeople to increase their presence through social media and how to correctly connect with—and sell to—their target clients. 

Value comes from experience. Jack has churned out content on social media, his blog, publications like The Harvard Business Review, and on podcasts—continually sharing what has worked for him, and how it took him from a newbie salesperson to the CEO of the US division of a Global Digital Agency.

4. Stop Selling and Build Trust Instead

Look, you don’t need to be Billy Mays or the ShamWow guy, pitching and promoting all day while operators are standing by. Constantly pushing product is exhausting. But talking and engaging with people in your own voice—your true self—and showing them how to succeed with examples and actionable ideas will build trust.

When you let people see the real you, trust is built and your brand strengthens and attracts new prospects.

Trust isn’t built by speaking AT people. It’s built by engaging and speaking WITH with your audience.

People like to do business with people they know, like and trust. And that’s usually not the guy with the bullhorn shouting “Look at me! Look at me!” Differentiate yourself by sharing knowledge from real-world experience in an authentic, engaging way that creates value and trustworthiness. This will build your personal brand.

When someone needs to seek out info in your industry, you will be top-of-mind because you will be the rockstar of your “boring” industry. They will come to you for the value you provide because you’ve built trust due to engagement, value, and expertise. 

 

The post Personal Branding Tips For Executives In “Boring” Industries appeared first on Personal Branding Blog – Stand Out In Your Career.