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Thanks to https://www.allbusiness.com/franchise-advice-franchisee-biggest-challenges-121616-1.html

By Josh Cohen

When you buy a franchise, you’re not starting a business from scratch, but you still have work to do. Many new franchisees underestimate what it takes to succeed—they don’t realize there’s more to franchising than just picking a brand and opening a new location. Becoming a new franchisee is an uphill climb that requires a lot of time and effort.

Think of yourself as a mountain climber. You have tools like ropes, a pickax, and a harness, but now you need to start climbing. Success is waiting at the top and you just need to get there.

It’s much easier to navigate your route if you know what you’re in for. That way you can prepare ahead of time and sidestep these challenges with ease when they rear their ugly head.

Challenge #1: Building the brand

Joining a franchise isn’t a walk in the park. But even though it’s tough, it’s also exciting. You get to take an established brand and blaze a trail into uncharted territory. Your personal efforts are helping the brand find a new audience—and that alone should build your confidence and make you proud.

You’re building something with the support of a larger, experienced team and you’ll be wearing different hats every day. This work requires a hands-on approach, especially during the early stages.

Be prepared to invest a lot of personal determination, long hours, and patience. If you’re not ready for this investment, you might want to bow out. But if these requirements sound more like motivators than roadblocks, then you’re going to get a lot of value out of your franchisee role.

You’ll be tempted to fine-tune everything inside your business, but don’t get off track. This will prevent you from scaling the brand. Before committing to a marketing decision, ask yourself if it helps build the brand or not. You need to fill each day, week, and month with actions that create brand awareness and drive revenue.

If you’re unsure of where to start, here are a few tactics you can use to build your franchise and increase brand awareness in the market:

  • Use the franchisor’s existing sales and marketing tools.
  • Do guerilla marketing activities to generate brand awareness.
  • Network with fellow business owners.
  • Show appreciation to your customers.
  • Seek out referral partners.
  • Use paid advertising to support your efforts.

The biggest takeaway is to always work on your business. Don’t get stuck working in your business.

Challenge #2: Managing employees effectively

You could try to do everything yourself, but that would waste time and lead to burnout. Get help from trusted employees instead of taking it all on solo—but that’s easier said than done. The challenge here is to hire the right people to work in your franchise.

You don’t have the luxury of an HR department to hire and train new employees, but this lets you vet potential employees based on what your business needs. You have to build a team (and fast), but it doesn’t mean hiring anyone just based on credentials. Look for people who are independent self-starters that crave responsibility. These people will be your pillars as you grow. Remind yourself that you’re only as strong as your weakest link—it will keep your franchise afloat.

Hiring is only one piece of the puzzle. You must also find ways to motivate your team to grow the franchise and customer base. This allows you to test new methodologies and find what pushes certain people to be their best selves. Use the company mission to your advantage. Reiterate it constantly in your emails, meetings, and actions. Tell your employees how their work directly affects the success of this mission. You’ll hold them accountable and show them they’re more than cogs and make the whole operation run smoothly. Nothing motivates employees like knowing that their actions make a difference.

Other Articles From AllBusiness.com:

Challenge #3: Creating a vibrant company culture

Company culture determines how the sales process works. It influences your customer service; it even helps potential employees decide whether or not they want to work for you. The toughest part about culture is creating it. The good news is you can adopt the existing culture from the brand—it’s already established. The unique challenge is bringing it to your market and adding local flavor to it.

The franchisor will share this vision as part of the business model, and you’ll be responsible for making it stick. Company culture will embody:

  • A purpose
  • Strong core values
  • A direct mission statement

It’s everything that makes the brand tick—a succinct way to describe why the company is in business.

Remember that company culture goes beyond perks. It’s not about office ping-pong or free snacks. It’s about how your employees feel and how they operate. It’s important to get it right because your culture will shape your work environment. The ball’s in your court to make it happen.

When the right company culture is in place, you’ll see:

  • More collaboration
  • Better retention rates
  • Employee accountability
  • Shared responsibility

A good company culture benefits customers as well. When the company’s culture resonates with an employee, they’re generally happier. Happier employees provide better customer service. It’s a win-win.

Get a leg up on the competition by knowing your challenges ahead of time

There’s a false statistic that convinces many people to become franchisees. It says that franchises have a success rate of approximately 90%. The study compares this to the 15% success rate for businesses started from the ground up and makes franchises seem like easy “get rich quick” opportunities.

I’m here to tell you that succeeding with franchising takes more than just an investment of money. Franchises require a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to succeed. They’re not easy to build, but there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Franchises have a higher rate of success than independent startups. They also connect you with a new network of like-minded professionals. And they give you valuable business experience: You learn how to become a well-balanced business owner. Your hard work on your business pays off over time.

It’s not an easy path to take, but with the right mind-set and support system in place, you can understand how a successful business operates. The entrepreneurial lessons you learn along the way are invaluable.

Once you’re through these challenges, it’s an easier climb to the summit. You’ll still hit some rough patches, but at least you can divert your path and work around the big challenges.

RELATED: 8 Warning Signs You Shouldn’t Buy a Franchise

About the Author

Post by: Josh Cohen

Josh Cohen is the CEO and founder of Junkluggers. He founded Junkluggers out of his mom’s Dodge Durango 14 years ago and has grown the company into one of the largest junk removal franchises in the country. For Josh, it’s about much more than just hauling junk away. He has a greater mission guiding everything they do. Their B.H.A.G. is to ensure no junk collected by Junkluggers enters a landfill by 2025. They are completing the process now to convert their corporation into a B-corp, meaning that while they do strive for profits, they’re also driven by and held accountable to bettering the world.

Company: Junkluggers
Website: www.junkluggers.com
Connect with me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The post 3 Biggest Challenges Every Franchisee Faces—And How to Overcome Them appeared first on AllBusiness.com

The post 3 Biggest Challenges Every Franchisee Faces—And How to Overcome Them appeared first on AllBusiness.com. Click for more information about Guest Post.

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Thanks to http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/SmallBusinessTrends/~3/FTML016jjLs/made-in-america-week.html

Made in America Week - Buy American

Yesterday the White House proclaimed the start of Made in America Week, which runs July 14 – 20, 2019.  The week kicked off with a “Made in America” showcase for products made in the USA.  The showcase featured manufacturers, makers and crafters – representing each of the 50 states.

You could think of it as a trade expo, only it took place at the White House instead of a convention center.  And there was the gigantic THAAD missile brought in by Lockheed Martin, something you don’t see everyday.

Still, plenty of small businesses were featured. The products covered a huge range, including:

  • Glass marbles from Marble King, a family business located in West Virginia.
  • Baseball gloves by Nokona, which started in a small town in Texas.
  • Home decor made by Redline Steel, a veteran-owned business from Alabama.
  • Bicycles from Tennessee-based Litespeed, whose wheels are so rugged they also were used on a Mars Rover.
  • BBQ grills by Dakota Grills, a small business from South Dakota
  • MudPuppies chocolate cookies by Mississippi Cheese Straw Factory, a family business in Yazoo City, Mississippi
  • Duck calls by RNT Rich-N-Tone Calls, a small business out of Arkansas
  • Axes by Council Tool, a 133-year old family business located in North Carolina
  • Wine from Willamette Valley Vineyards of Turner, Oregon
  • Bottle openers by Snake Bite, a small business out of St. Louis, Missouri
  • Jelly from Backyard Jams and Jellies, a small business in Milton, Delaware

“Joining us today are manufacturers from all 50 states. And they are terrific talents, terrific craftsmen, terrific business people. We have hats from Wyoming, sandals from Florida, Tabasco from Louisiana, Airstream trailers … from Ohio, and custom-built motorcycles from the great state of Indiana,” said President Trump in his live remarks at the showcase.

This coverage below by a local Nexstar NBC affiliate gave one of the best business focused accounts of the event. Correspondent Brie Jackson reported, “Several business owners I spoke with say they’ve benefited from the Trump Administration’s policies. They are urging lawmakers to work together to support more American workers.”

Committing to a Buy American Policy

The President highlighted the contributions of American manufacturers, noting they have contributed $250 billion more to the economy since 2016. They also created 600,000 manufacturing jobs.

President Trump also used the event to announce the strengthening of “buy American” policies.  He pointed out that up until now, products could be 50% foreign and still count as American made.  However, he took the opportunity to sign a new Buy American executive order to gradually increase the standard for American-made to 75% for most products, and 95% for certain products like steel.

Made in America Week

The Proclamation announcing Made in America Week highlighted the contributions of American entrepreneurs:

“On Made in America Day and during Made in America Week, we honor the extraordinary efforts of American entrepreneurs, workers, and farmers in revitalizing our Nation’s economy. Products made in America are the world standard for quality and showcase the craftsmanship of the most innovative, diverse, highly skilled, and dedicated workforce in the world. When we buy American-made products, we support the American workers who build them and we invigorate the American economy, driving job growth, spurring innovation, and bolstering the middle class.”

The President summed up the impact of American-made products stating, “When we choose American-made, something truly wonderful happens: Our communities thrive and flourish, our neighborhoods bustle with commerce, our children dream bigger and bolder, and the bonds of loyalty that unite us as citizens become closer, richer, and deeper than ever before.”

Vice President Mike Pence also attended.  The image above shows him viewing some of the American-made products on display.  More can be seen on his Twitter timeline here and here.

Hashtags being used on social media are: #BuyAmerican #MadeinAmerica #MadeinUSA #MadeinAmericaWeek

Image: Office of the Vice President Twitter account

This article, “White House Kicks Off “Made in America” Week” was first published on Small Business Trends

Did this stuff about working from home are helpful! who agrees?

Thanks to https://www.allbusiness.com/franchise-advice-franchisee-biggest-challenges-121616-1.html

By Josh Cohen

When you buy a franchise, you’re not starting a business from scratch, but you still have work to do. Many new franchisees underestimate what it takes to succeed—they don’t realize there’s more to franchising than just picking a brand and opening a new location. Becoming a new franchisee is an uphill climb that requires a lot of time and effort.

Think of yourself as a mountain climber. You have tools like ropes, a pickax, and a harness, but now you need to start climbing. Success is waiting at the top and you just need to get there.

It’s much easier to navigate your route if you know what you’re in for. That way you can prepare ahead of time and sidestep these challenges with ease when they rear their ugly head.

Challenge #1: Building the brand

Joining a franchise isn’t a walk in the park. But even though it’s tough, it’s also exciting. You get to take an established brand and blaze a trail into uncharted territory. Your personal efforts are helping the brand find a new audience—and that alone should build your confidence and make you proud.

You’re building something with the support of a larger, experienced team and you’ll be wearing different hats every day. This work requires a hands-on approach, especially during the early stages.

Be prepared to invest a lot of personal determination, long hours, and patience. If you’re not ready for this investment, you might want to bow out. But if these requirements sound more like motivators than roadblocks, then you’re going to get a lot of value out of your franchisee role.

You’ll be tempted to fine-tune everything inside your business, but don’t get off track. This will prevent you from scaling the brand. Before committing to a marketing decision, ask yourself if it helps build the brand or not. You need to fill each day, week, and month with actions that create brand awareness and drive revenue.

If you’re unsure of where to start, here are a few tactics you can use to build your franchise and increase brand awareness in the market:

  • Use the franchisor’s existing sales and marketing tools.
  • Do guerilla marketing activities to generate brand awareness.
  • Network with fellow business owners.
  • Show appreciation to your customers.
  • Seek out referral partners.
  • Use paid advertising to support your efforts.

The biggest takeaway is to always work on your business. Don’t get stuck working in your business.

Challenge #2: Managing employees effectively

You could try to do everything yourself, but that would waste time and lead to burnout. Get help from trusted employees instead of taking it all on solo—but that’s easier said than done. The challenge here is to hire the right people to work in your franchise.

You don’t have the luxury of an HR department to hire and train new employees, but this lets you vet potential employees based on what your business needs. You have to build a team (and fast), but it doesn’t mean hiring anyone just based on credentials. Look for people who are independent self-starters that crave responsibility. These people will be your pillars as you grow. Remind yourself that you’re only as strong as your weakest link—it will keep your franchise afloat.

Hiring is only one piece of the puzzle. You must also find ways to motivate your team to grow the franchise and customer base. This allows you to test new methodologies and find what pushes certain people to be their best selves. Use the company mission to your advantage. Reiterate it constantly in your emails, meetings, and actions. Tell your employees how their work directly affects the success of this mission. You’ll hold them accountable and show them they’re more than cogs and make the whole operation run smoothly. Nothing motivates employees like knowing that their actions make a difference.

Other Articles From AllBusiness.com:

Challenge #3: Creating a vibrant company culture

Company culture determines how the sales process works. It influences your customer service; it even helps potential employees decide whether or not they want to work for you. The toughest part about culture is creating it. The good news is you can adopt the existing culture from the brand—it’s already established. The unique challenge is bringing it to your market and adding local flavor to it.

The franchisor will share this vision as part of the business model, and you’ll be responsible for making it stick. Company culture will embody:

  • A purpose
  • Strong core values
  • A direct mission statement

It’s everything that makes the brand tick—a succinct way to describe why the company is in business.

Remember that company culture goes beyond perks. It’s not about office ping-pong or free snacks. It’s about how your employees feel and how they operate. It’s important to get it right because your culture will shape your work environment. The ball’s in your court to make it happen.

When the right company culture is in place, you’ll see:

  • More collaboration
  • Better retention rates
  • Employee accountability
  • Shared responsibility

A good company culture benefits customers as well. When the company’s culture resonates with an employee, they’re generally happier. Happier employees provide better customer service. It’s a win-win.

Get a leg up on the competition by knowing your challenges ahead of time

There’s a false statistic that convinces many people to become franchisees. It says that franchises have a success rate of approximately 90%. The study compares this to the 15% success rate for businesses started from the ground up and makes franchises seem like easy “get rich quick” opportunities.

I’m here to tell you that succeeding with franchising takes more than just an investment of money. Franchises require a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to succeed. They’re not easy to build, but there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Franchises have a higher rate of success than independent startups. They also connect you with a new network of like-minded professionals. And they give you valuable business experience: You learn how to become a well-balanced business owner. Your hard work on your business pays off over time.

It’s not an easy path to take, but with the right mind-set and support system in place, you can understand how a successful business operates. The entrepreneurial lessons you learn along the way are invaluable.

Once you’re through these challenges, it’s an easier climb to the summit. You’ll still hit some rough patches, but at least you can divert your path and work around the big challenges.

RELATED: 8 Warning Signs You Shouldn’t Buy a Franchise

About the Author

Post by: Josh Cohen

Josh Cohen is the CEO and founder of Junkluggers. He founded Junkluggers out of his mom’s Dodge Durango 14 years ago and has grown the company into one of the largest junk removal franchises in the country. For Josh, it’s about much more than just hauling junk away. He has a greater mission guiding everything they do. Their B.H.A.G. is to ensure no junk collected by Junkluggers enters a landfill by 2025. They are completing the process now to convert their corporation into a B-corp, meaning that while they do strive for profits, they’re also driven by and held accountable to bettering the world.

Company: Junkluggers
Website: www.junkluggers.com
Connect with me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

The post 3 Biggest Challenges Every Franchisee Faces—And How to Overcome Them appeared first on AllBusiness.com

The post 3 Biggest Challenges Every Franchisee Faces—And How to Overcome Them appeared first on AllBusiness.com. Click for more information about Guest Post.